In a Jumble

I’m a little late this week, I’ll blame that on the season. Here’s a few things I enjoyed this week.


Paige Lewis has a slice of her longer poem in Poetry this week. It covers the story of Yael, a classic revengeful woman in Jewish storytelling who brings an enemy into her tent to lull into a stupor before driving nails into his head as he sleeps.


The poem follows the lines of the original story, but its presentation of Yael as a woman with internality and conflict within herself bring answer, more modern dimensions to the story.

The style remains poetic in prose, which is what you’d expect from Paige at this point — an ability to zoom in to different parts of a scene one after another and give each moment its equal importance.


This weird poetry-on-a-train thing (poets love trains don’t they?) features a small slice of Rosebud Ben-Oni amongst other very good poets. It seems quite jolly, but obviously wouldn’t work on the misery of UK public transport.


I enjoyed this Jericho Brown poem, Duplex, for the balancing of each side of each coupled line.


A classic balancing of this is and it isn’t, all at once.


Song of the week is this really exceptional cover of The Smiths This Charming Man by a Japanese Reggae/Ska band called The Swing Easy Orchestra. It sent me on a funny little Smiths tour, and apparently I remember all the words.


I thought to myself after buying this issue of Poetry that £3 for a Paige Lewis poem is excellent value for money. I have gone almost completely deaf, I will make amends. Unrelated to writing, really, but these buildings of the future need our love. I think it is difficult to always see how good things are from the inside, but then there’s usually room to make them a little better.

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